Staying Healthy in College

Staying healthy in college can be difficult.  Last month the Hope & Wellness Center lead efforts to raise awareness on campus regarding eating disorders as part Nation Eating Disorders Awareness Week.  Here are some thought provoking stats on that:edstat.jpg

Unlike many trends and fad diets will lead you to believe, a healthy diet is well rounded in all of the Macro nutrients.  In fact, the key to a healthy weight and even lasting weight loss is a diet balanced in macronutrients.  Lacie Glover gives 6 great reasons to eat healthy in her article here: https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/health/medical-costs/benefits-of-eating-healthy/

foodOf course, we’ve all heard or been lectured on a nutritious diet.  With the many campus activities held each month, there is even a lot of opportunities to have great meals for free on campus! But what are other ways we, as students, can stay healthy?

Get enough sleep:

Dave Grossman, a Psychologist and Author, talks extensively about sleep and how our bodies need it and what happens when we don’t get enough.  Students often miss out on a lot of sleep.  Between extra curricular activities, hanging with friends, studying for that exam… or not being able to sleep out of anxious for that exam.  For a long time many believed that once missed, sleep could not be made up for.  Turns out, according to Dr. Grossman, that sleep does indeed have a “bank” that we can add into.  So don’t feel guilty for that nap you’re about to take in between classes!  In fact, according to our own Dr. Calvillo, sleep helps solidify what you just learned, transitioning it all into long-term memory!

(Here’s a great article on Dr. Dave Grossman’s work which is super interesting, especially for our large veteran population: https://www.stripes.com/seeking-better-sleep-1.133924#.WL5PHPnytPY ) Continue reading

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National Eating Disorders Week @ CSUSM

In United States, 20 million women and 10 million suffer from a clinically significant eating disorder at some time in their life, including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder (http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/types-symptoms-eating-disorders).

At least 30 million people of all ages and genders suffer from an eating disorder in the U.S (http://www.anad.org/get-information/about-eating-disorders/eating-disorders-statistics/).

The media depicts images that our society should abide by. We mostly see images that show women and men should have these perfect bodies that would be admired by anyone. Losing weight is what comes to mind when you want to have that perfect body to be admired, loved, and happy.

If you have an eating disorder or know someone who does, you are not alone. Knowing that others have experienced eating disorders, hopefully allows you to believe there is hope and will encourage your willingness to get help. Every 62 minutes at least one person dies as a direct result from an eating disorder (http://www.anad.org/get-information/about-eating-disorders/eating-disorders-statistics/). Continue reading

Depression: What next?

“Anxiety is the cousin visiting out of town that depression felt obligated to bring to the party. Mom, I am the party, only I am a party I don’t want to be at.” –(Button Poetry) Sabrina Benaim.

Depression is a word full of stigma and taboo, that our society often pushes aside and tries to avoid. Now, what exactly does the word depression mean to you? To many it’s a word used as a simple temporary emotion. Reality, depression is defined as a serious mental health condition in which a person feels very hopeless, unimportant and sad. Those affected by it are often unable to live in a normal way, and it typically occurs for prolonged periods of time.

quote-depression-chemistryAn estimate of 25 million individuals in the United States suffer from major depression. According Nami, National Alliance on Mental Illnesses, “Women are 70% more likely than men to experience depression, and young adults aged 18–25 are 60% more likely to have depression than people aged 50 or older.” http://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Depression

Being affected by depression makes it difficult to feel motivated to try to push yourself to feel better. Overcoming depression isn’t easy, it takes a lot of time and patience with oneself. You can’t just will yourself or others to simply “snap out of it,” or “get over it” chances are it won’t help them or you. However, there are many options and abilities to govern depression better than you realize—even if it’s severe or very persistent. Feeling better takes time, but can be achieved if you make positive choices for yourself or others each day. It’s important to start small by:

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Clear the RAINN Day!

CleartheRAINNdayEvery 107 seconds, another American is sexually assaulted. Sexual assault is a crime of power and control. Each year, there are about 293,00 victims of sexual assault. What can we do to prevent or limit the amount of cases of sexual assault on our campus? The first is to know WHAT sexual assault consists of. WHO and what resources we can contact in the case of a sexual assault event occurring. Also, who to contact for a sexual assault aftermath, to help recover. HOW we can reduce the risks and raise awareness on our campus and nationwide.

There are different types of sexual assaults. The most commonly known is penetration of the body or rape. It does not end there. Attempted rape is considered sexual assault. Forcing a victim to perform sexual acts, fondling, or unwanted sexual touching are all actions classified as sexual assault. The action of forcing ones self onto another without consent, both parties agreeing or permitting sexual contact, is unacceptable and should be reported. Sexual assault is a crime. College-aged women are 3 times more likely than women in general to suffer from sexual violence.

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